Downsizing Mistakes I Have Made

DownsiingAgainI’m involved in another round of downsizing this month, and as I become aware of some of the things I could have done better along the way, it occurred to me it might be helpful to share with our readers some of the downsizing mistakes I’ve made.

Of course it would be nice to maintain the illusion that a person who is coauthor of  a book about downsizing doesn’t make mistakes. But of course we all make mistakes, and the best thing we can do about that is to learn from them. Therefore, here are a few of the things I’ve done wrong, which I am sharing in the hope that others will benefit from reading about them.

Mistake #1.

It’s the #1 tip in our book, but sometimes it is hard to do: Take. Your. Time.

The reason it’s hard to do this is that often when a move comes up, there are circumstances beyond our control that force us to move more quickly than is ideal for making good decisions.

So it has been in my case. This year, as I approached the task again, I realized, in retrospect, that I moved too quickly in the last round. This has led to my gaining several pieces of wisdom that I suppose should have been obvious: but when one is moving too quickly, the obvious doesn’t always stand out.

  1. Since one of the main goals of downsizing is to reduce volume, it’s best to focus on objects that take up lots of space than on small items that can be easily stored away to deal with when you have more time. This means that, for example, you’re probably going to want to focus on furniture, books, and other objects that take up lots of space, especially if they are going to be in storage (for example, cooking equipment and glassware, china, pottery, etc.: things that have to be wrapped in bubble wrap and so on, rather than on jewelry, ephemera, and other things that can be kept flat, or tucked into small boxes rather than large ones, taking up little space.
  2. When (finally) saying goodbye to sentimental items that really must go (usually, but not always, because they take up too much space), be sure to take the time to properly honor what they have meant to you, and make sure that whatever you do with them honors the sometimes sacred meaning they have for you. The best example of this that I have is the little handmade felt heart that my son made for me in school as a child. When he was helping me in the first round of dealing with all the things in my storage locker, he urged me to let go of the heart, and reluctantly I agreed to do so. But I made two mistakes about letting go of this heart. One was to not, right at that moment, to take a picture of the two of us together, holding the heart. I would have loved to have this picture; even he (who is much less sentimental than I) would probably have liked to have it too; and I would have liked to be able to share that picture on this post. (It would have been demonstrating something like “You see? Working together, we CAN find ways to say goodbye even to some of our most special, sentimental items.”) But I did not think to do that. Instead the heart went into my car, along with a lot of other stuff. And when eventually I got rid of it (telling myself, “He WANTS you to get rid of this. You promised you would!”)  I did NOT find an honorable place or way to say goodbye to it. (The truth is that I cannot even tell you what I did with it, because the memory is too painful.) Even Marie Kondo, whose method for decluttering is seen by many people (including to some degree by me) as too extreme, recognizes the importance of honoring the sacred meaning of such special items. I am pretty sure if she had been standing there, she would have urged me to find a different way to send that beautiful little heart out of my life than the one I finally chose.
  3. Since inevitably you will make some mistakes, know that this is inevitable, and give yourself a break. And when you are feeling regret, know that this too is an inevitable part of the process. This is the time to check your Regret-o-Meter, and move on, wiser for the next stage of downsizing.

Spring is nearly here, and you know what that means: time for spring cleaning, and proactive downsizing!

Here’s hoping that some kernel of wisdom above will help you to go quickly enough to get the job done, and not so quickly that you are filled with regret.

Janet Hulstrand is a writer, editor, writing coach, and coauthor of  Moving On: A Practical Guide to Downsizing the Family Home. She is also the author of Demystifying the French: How to Love Them, and Make Them Love You

 

 

 

Downsizing: Getting Keepers and Throwers to Work Together in Harmony…

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Adrian Leeds (left) and Janet Hulstrand (right)

Last week I had the opportunity to talk to a group of English-speaking people in Paris about our book and what we had learned in the process of writing it. I was invited to speak by my friend Adrian Leeds, who helps Americans (and other Anglophones) find and buy property in France. I decided for the purposes of this talk to focus on how to get “keepers” and “throwers” to work together harmoniously when downsizing in order to get the job done.

There was a big crowd: downsizing and decluttering are popular topics of discussion, if not always popular activities, and these two closely-related topics are of particular interest to people who are contemplating an international move, which some of the people in the audience were doing. (Others had already made the move and had stories to share about their experiences.)

I told the group about how in the course of writing our book my coauthor and I had decided that when it comes to downsizing, the world is divided (more or less) into “keepers” and “throwers.”

Of course, we are really talking about a continuum, with “extreme keepers” at one end of the spectrum, and “extreme throwers” at the other, with most people falling somewhere in the middle, but tending toward one or the other end of the spectrum. Many people are actually “keepers” about some categories of items and “throwers” about others. And a frequent area of conflict and upsetting family dynamics can occur when “keepers” and “throwers” collide during the process of downsizing: or when their respective categories of keeping and throwing do: hence the focus of my talk.

I explained first of all that when I say “extreme keepers” I do not mean hoarders. Hoarding is a very specific, and very difficult, problem to deal with, and it requires highly sensitive, and very often professional help; lots of patience and compassion; and a good understanding of the condition. (My coauthor interviewed Dr. Gail Steketee, an expert on this topic, here.)

I told my audience that the number-one piece of advice we have in our book is to “take your time” and–drawing on some of the stories we tell in our book to illustrate the point–explained how and why following that one piece of advice can lead to smoother, more peaceful family dynamics, fewer regrets, and more success in moving ahead with the task, especially for keepers.

I also told about how we had come up with our motto “Keep the memories, get rid of the stuff,”  how and why that is particularly helpful for the “keepers” of the world, and some of the concrete ways of doing this. (I think one of the strengths of our book is that we have more sympathy for the difficulty keepers have in letting go of things, and that is why we are able to offer more helpful advice than many of the decluttering books out there. We don’t say things like “If you haven’t used it in a year…” because we know that saying things like that does not really address the problem for keepers!)

It was really rewarding to see the enthusiasm with which these messages were received by the group, and to hear some of their comments after my talk. One woman (a thrower, I do believe) came up to me afterward and told me she was going to be nicer to her husband from now on. (“He really needs to be able to take his time and savor those memories” she said.) Another woman said she felt very affirmed to know that she was not alone in having trouble making the decisions about what to keep and what to let go of, and to have a better idea of how to find the resolve to do it. One woman talked about the dilemma she felt about keeping “old soccer pictures” and the like for her grown children, and yet not wanting to keep them in her own home anymore. (She received several pieces of advice from the crowd: I believe her favorite one was to send a box of such things to each of her grown children, who do have homes of their own by now!)

We often remind our readers that this time of year, as families gather for the holidays, can be a good time to begin that long, drawn-out process of “moving on,” getting rid of or redistributing family heirlooms, making a plan for when Mom and/or Dad might want to downsize, and talking about how their children can help them do it.

Our book has been very helpful to many families, and also to the professional organizers, senior move managers, social workers and others who help people through this process. We hope it may be helpful for you and yours also.

And although used copies of the 2004 edition can still be purchased online, we also like to remind people that the updated 2013 edition is available in ebook only. And while we know that many people favor print, we also like to remind our readers that this particular book can be very handy in the ebook format, with its live links to many of the sites we refer to in our resource section.

Not only that, but remember: ebooks do not take up shelf space! 🙂 Just saying…

Janet Hulstrand is a writer/editor, writing coach, travel blogger, and coauthor of  Moving On: A Practical Guide to Downsizing the Family Home.

 

On My Reading List: The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning by Margareta Magnusson

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Well, this “coming soon” title has definitely caught my eye, not only because of my Swedish-American roots, but because the title of the book seems—to me anyway—ever-so-slightly ironic/sardonic, as well as obviously quite provocative. (Those Swedes, they don’t mess around! 🙂 )

Reviewed this week by Jura Koncius in the Washington Post, the book, which is scheduled for publication in the U.S. in January, sounds like yet another gentle pushing back at—or at least moderating influence over—the Marie Kondo “magic of tidying up” tidal wave that has swept the nation in the past few years. The publisher describes The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning as “a charming, practical, and unsentimental approach” to downsizing and decluttering, which sounds either helpful or frightening, depending I suppose, on one’s perspective—that is, as we have discussed in our book, on whether the reader of the book is a “keeper” or a “thrower.”

It’s interesting to me that this book comes from Sweden. I have often thought about the fact that within a few short generations my ancestors, who arrived in the U.S. with nothing more than a couple of trunks, a lot of courage, and the determination to succeed in a new land the way they hadn’t been able to in the old one, ended up with big houses, garages, attics, barns, and so on, crammed full of stuff that their grandchildren and great-grandchildren tended to feel very attached to, but were not quite sure what to do with. I have wondered if it is in part the fact that there was that lingering and painful historical memory of having had to leave everything behind in Sweden that fueled part of the fierce resistance to letting go of things that is very familiar to me as a Swedish-American Minnesotan.

So the explanation in the Washington Post article that “death cleaning”—that is, doing most of the getting rid of things before you die, so your survivors don’t have to it—is a very Swedish thing (“almost biological” says the Swedish ambassador to the U.S.) and the author’s view that it’s “not fair” to leave that task to others to me feels on the one hand surprisingly un-Swedish (that is, the getting-rid-of-things part), and on the other hand very Swedish indeed (the-importance-of-fairness part).

In any case, I’m looking forward to reading this book. And I imagine we’ll be letting you know more about how well it complements our approach to downsizing—or doesn’t?—later. So stay tuned for more…

Janet Hulstrand is a writer/editor, writing coach, travel blogger, and coauthor of Moving On: A Practical Guide to Downsizing the Family Home.

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