Obstacles to Downsizing: The Inner Collector and the Inner Archivist

 

In a couple of recent posts I have talked about the “voices” of various parts of me that tend to slow me down when I am engaged in the process of downsizing and decluttering (or trying to become engaged in it). In the first one I talked about my “Inner Ecologist” and my “Inner Altruist.” The next one was about my “Inner Sentimentalist” (The latter is one that we have been told our book is especially helpful in dealing with. Boiled down to a  few words our main message/mantra for the Inner Sentimentalist is Keep the memories, get rid of the stuff…)

There are two other voices that tend to arise in this process also. One of them is the voice of the Inner Collector, and the other is the voice of the Inner Archivist.

These two voices for me, and probably for many people, are the most difficult to deal with in a way. After all, the main challenge with the Inner Ecologist and the Inner Altruist is simply overcoming inertia, or procrastination; basically just summoning the time, energy, and motivation to get those things out of the house to recycling, reusing, or donating places.

But the problems that the Inner Collector and the Inner Archivist are drawing our attention to are often quite a bit more complicated. In these two cases, the challenge may be to find appropriate homes for very special objects or historical documentation: things that are actually quite valuable and deserve to be carefully placed somewhere where they can be preserved and enjoyed by others: and safeguarded for the future.

In some cases, the voice of the Inner Collector has probably been overly influenced by television programs like Antiques Roadshow and online resale sites like eBay.  I remember that when we were first shopping our book to publishers, one of the comments of the editor who ended up choosing to publish it  was that she was having difficulty getting her parents to get rid of some of the things in their too-full-of-things home. “We’re sitting on a fortune here!” she said her father would protest whenever she tried to urge them to get rid of some of those things.

But unless you are willing to invest the time and energy into making collecting a moneymaking venture by making yourself an expert on whatever type of collectible is involved, it’s probably best to get rid of most, or at least many, of the old things that you’ve been saving against the day they may be “worth a fortune,” and let someone else enjoy them and get whatever profit there may be in selling them. (This is also a reason why hiring professionals to run your estate sale is often a good idea: they know the market for antiques and collectibles much better than most people, and usually they will have a vested interest in trying to help you make the most amount of money from your sale because it is to their benefit as well as yours. We discuss this in our book also.)

On the other hand, some people either have kept, or have inherited, serious collections that do in fact have real value, either as something to sell, or something to donate to a museum or library. We go into how best to deal with serious collections in some detail in our book, and we provide links to organizations and institutions that can help people know where to turn for even more detailed information and advice in the resource section.

The voice that is hardest of all for me to ignore, and/or deal with,  is the voice of my Inner Archivist. As a writer, I know only too well how valuable old letters, journals, cards, and other documentation of various kinds can be for writers, researchers, and historians of the future. And so, to be honest, it is really hard for me to throw away almost anything on paper. (This does not mean I never do it. It means it is almost always pretty hard to do. That Inner Archivist keeps saying things like “Wouldn’t this be interesting for someone to come across in a hundred years?” (!) One of the things I was told by the director of a local historical museum when I interviewed her for our book was that one thing you can do with old cards, papers, and letters is take them to your local historical society and let the experts make the decisions about what should be kept, and what can be discarded. She used a wonderful phrase in explaining to me that sometimes items that are not appropriate for the local collection may be sent to another historical society where they would be welcomed. She called this “sending it home.” I loved that phrase, and that idea!

So I would never urge anyone to throw away really old documents if you come across them in your downsizing/decluttering activities. You might want to see instead if your local historical society would have an interest in them.

Of course all of this takes time, more time than just tossing documents into the recycling barrel.

Which is why the #1 piece of advice in our book is to start now! And take your time… 🙂 

Janet Hulstrand is a writer/editor, writing coach, travel blogger, and coauthor of  Moving On: A Practical Guide to Downsizing the Family Home.

 

 

 

 

 

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