Giving Thanks and Giving Back

GIVE illo

Thanksgiving, our national holiday for giving thanks, was established in 19th century; the very end of the 20th century brought us Black Friday for shopping in stores, and in the 21st century we have Cyber Monday for shopping online. Are we making progress? There is something not quite right about two “holidays” for getting more stuff and only one for giving thanks for what we have.

As a counter to all the “getting” we now have Giving Tuesday, celebrated on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving – December 1 this year – that kicks off the season of giving and helps provide an alternative to the frenzy of shopping. Started in 2012 by the 92nd Street Y, an important cultural institution in New York City, in partnership with the United Nations Foundation, Giving Tuesday has become a movement that celebrates and supports giving.

According to the #GivingTuesday website, the global day of giving “harnesses the potential of social media and the generosity of people around the world to bring about real change in their communities… encourages the donation of time, resources and talents to address local challenges…brings together the collective power of a unique blend of partners…to encourage and amplify small acts of kindness.”

Some welcoming statistics from this giving holiday:

  • More than 30,000 partners in 68 countries participate.
  • Online donations have increased an estimated 40 percent on that Tuesday.
  • People have tweeted 32.7 million times with more than 750,000 hashtag mentions.

If you need help in deciding just how to participate in giving back, visit the Tools page as well as the Frequently Asked Questions segment of the website.

In celebration of giving back and not getting more, let’s express thanks to Jerry Stritzke, the CEO of REI, the sporting goods emporium, who decided to close all his stores on Black Friday to encourage his staff to enjoy the outdoors with family and friends. Let’s all #optoutside on the day after Thanksgiving.

Black Friday started with stores opening their doors at 6 am on Friday. The opening time migrated back to midnight, and then to Thanksgiving Day itself. In response to an increasing dissatisfaction with people having to work retail on the holiday, many stores have chosen not to open at all on Thanksgiving. Not as wonderful a decision as that of REI’s chief, it’s at least something to be thankful for. Here’s a list of those stores that will remain closed on the holiday.

And for those of us who would like to vote with our feet, we can make a statement by staying out of the stores that plan to open on Thanksgiving, not only on the holiday, of course, but on the days following, or perhaps start a writing campaign by emailing the CEOs to express our dissatisfaction with their decision to remain open, during what should be their employees’ family time. Here’s a list of stores that will be open on Thanksgiving.

So this Thanksgiving, let’s be thankful for what we have and not focus on how much more we want to get.

Here’s to a wonderful Thanksgiving to all our readers, a day of good food and family fun, a celebration of joy and health and happiness, and, most importantly, a time for gratitude.

Linda Hetzer is an editor and author of books on home designcrafts, and food, and coauthor of Moving On: A Practical Guide to Downsizing the Family Home

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